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5 Ways Seniors Can Improve Their Eye Health

5 Ways Seniors Can Improve Their Eye Health

We often take our senses for granted, until we lose one or more of them. I have a friend who can’t taste anything as the side effect of a medication she took years ago. She says that it doesn’t bother her as much as it did at the beginning. I suspect it’s because she knows that losing her sense of taste was a risk she was willing to take because those drugs saved her life. In other words, there wasn’t much she could do to prevent the loss of taste in her case. This week, we want to ask you to ask yourself some questions, that may seem basic on the surface, but as you read this post you will see how important your answers are! Which of the five senses do you rely upon the most? Do you live alone? Is your home a house or an apartment? How often do you visit the eye doctor? Why prevention matters The CNIB (Canadian National Institute for the Blind) offers great resources for anyone who wants to learn about eye health. Did you know that every 12 minutes, someone in Canada begins to lose their eyesight? 75 per cent of vision loss can be prevented. We rely on our vision to drive or just get around in general. As adults, it can be challenging (but not impossible) to learn how to do things again. Why not take some care to ensure you maintain as much of your vision as possible? There are instances the outcome of which we cannot control, such as genetic predisposition, illness, environmental factors or an accident....

ICYMI: Why does blood pressure matter?

What’s your morning routine? Do you always get ready for bed the same way? We often find ourselves stuck on auto-pilot when it comes to daily tasks like maintaining personal hygiene or taking our vitamins and medication.  Have you noticed that you tend to rush through the things that could make a real difference in your general health and well being? We may ignore our blood pressure because it’s invisible. One of the tasks we build into our morning and bedtime routine is to measure our blood pressure. This vital sign can warn you of heart disease, including the likelihood of suffering from a heart attack or stroke. What is blood pressure? When your heart beats, it pumps blood throughout your body to provide it energy and oxygen. As the blood travels through your veins and arteries, it pushes against the sides (walls) of the blood vessels. Blood pressure is the force and the rate of the blood travelling through the blood vessels. Taking note of your blood pressure can help your doctor diagnose blocked arteries, hardened artery walls, irregular heart rate, and various other heart diseases. The Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation website is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to understand heart disease. Learn more about heart disease here. It can be difficult to decipher the meaning of the numbers on the reading, especially when we don’t really understand terms like systolic and diastolic. We like how the American Heart Association illustrates blood pressure readings so they’re easy to understand. Click here to see their chart. Heart Disease You may have been born with a heart condition (congenital),...
Have You Checked Your Blood Pressure Today?

Have You Checked Your Blood Pressure Today?

What’s your morning routine? Do you always get ready for bed the same way? We often find ourselves stuck on auto-pilot when it comes to daily tasks like maintaining personal hygiene or taking our vitamins and medication.  Have you noticed that you tend to rush through the things that could make a real difference in your general health and well being? We may ignore our blood pressure because it’s invisible. One of the tasks we build into our morning and bedtime routine is to measure our blood pressure. This vital sign can warn you of heart disease, including the likelihood of suffering from a heart attack or stroke. What is blood pressure? When your heart beats, it pumps blood throughout your body to provide it energy and oxygen. As the blood travels through your veins and arteries, it pushes against the sides (walls) of the blood vessels. Blood pressure is the force and the rate of the blood travelling through the blood vessels. Taking note of your blood pressure can help your doctor diagnose blocked arteries, hardened artery walls, irregular heart rate, and various other heart diseases. The Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation website is a valuable resource for anyone who wants to understand heart disease. Learn more about heart disease here. It can be difficult to decipher the meaning of the numbers on the reading, especially when we don’t really understand terms like systolic and diastolic. We like how the American Heart Association illustrates blood pressure readings so they’re easy to understand. Click here to see their chart. Heart Disease You may have been born with a heart...

ICYMI: Protect Your Family from Home Care Abuse

You may have seen the news about a live-in caregiver who was charged with theft in Burlington. It can be a real eye-opener when we see these crimes reported, especially when they occur in our own community. Stealing from someone who has entrusted a new person with their care is a serious violation. Theft, physical violence, deprivation of nutrition, verbal abuse and neglect are all forms of abuse. Your safety is our number one priority, and we do not tolerate elder abuse, or any other form of abuse. Screening caregivers A proper vetting process administered by a professional in the healthcare industry can give you peace of mind. Hiring someone from a publicly available advertisement may not yield the most appropriate candidate. Be aware of scams that give unverified people access to your home. Retire-At-Home uses a thorough screening process when we hire caregivers and nurses. We run criminal record checks, verify work permits for foreign workers and check all certifications and vaccine records. Our hiring process also takes into consideration your specific needs or ability to communicate. It can feel like you’re searching for the impossible. Try not to be stressed about it! Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton can help you. Get started Take a breath, and make a list of your needs. It’s helpful to determine your budget as well. The following checklist can help you get started: gather medication and medical history make notes on physical limitations list all the equipment you use (rented or owned) indicate all the languages you understand or prefer to use ask people in your community about potential referrals. You may have a personal support worker or...
Tips on Hiring a Caregiver or Nurse in the Halton Region

Tips on Hiring a Caregiver or Nurse in the Halton Region

You may have seen the news about a live-in caregiver who was charged with theft in Burlington. It can be a real eye-opener when we see these crimes reported, especially when they occur in our own community. Stealing from someone who has entrusted a new person with their care is a serious violation. Theft, physical violence, deprivation of nutrition, verbal abuse and neglect are all forms of abuse. Your safety is our number one priority, and we do not tolerate elder abuse, or any other form of abuse. Screening caregivers A proper vetting process administered by a professional in the healthcare industry can give you peace of mind. Hiring someone from a publicly available advertisement may not yield the most appropriate candidate. Be aware of scams that give unverified people access to your home. Retire-At-Home uses a thorough screening process when we hire caregivers and nurses. We run criminal record checks, verify work permits for foreign workers and check all certifications and vaccine records. Our hiring process also takes into consideration your specific needs or ability to communicate. It can feel like you’re searching for the impossible. Try not to be stressed about it! Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton can help you. Get started Take a breath, and make a list of your needs. It’s helpful to determine your budget as well. The following checklist can help you get started: gather medication and medical history make notes on physical limitations list all the equipment you use (rented or owned) indicate all the languages you understand or prefer to use ask people in your community about potential referrals. You may have a...

ICYMI: Why taking care of yourself should be your top resolution of 2018

We’re into the second week of 2018, and some of us are struggling to maintain our resolutions. It’s easy to say that we’ll eat better, or exercise more, or be kind to others. Putting all of this into practice can be, to put it lightly, tiring. If you are a caregiver for your aging parent, or a disabled dependent, you may be putting your own needs aside to focus on others. While it’s important to temper optimism with practical or frugal thinking, we know that being in a constant state of worry or difficulty can result in depression and anxiety. Being selfish about your own health is one way to make 2018 better for yourself and the people you love. Tips for approaching situations with a positive attitude There are so many things we can do for ourselves to help our mental well-being. Here are some of the ways our team has resolved to put some positivity into our lives. It’s time to shake off feeling guilty for not having time for everything. Be aware of stressors like not having enough time to accomplish your to-do list, or trying to cram too much into one day. Get an agenda or app for your phone to help you visualize your time management. Eat less processed or fast food. It’s so tempting to indulge in tasty treats, especially when it means you don’t have to plan or prep your meals. Eating good food can really affect how your brain processes emotions and your overall well-being. Colourful, fresh food is as tasty as it is pleasant to look at! We love keeping busy, and following through...
2018 is the Year of Positive Thinking

2018 is the Year of Positive Thinking

We’re into the second week of 2018, and some of us are struggling to maintain our resolutions. It’s easy to say that we’ll eat better, or exercise more, or be kind to others. Putting all of this into practice can be, to put it lightly, tiring. If you are a caregiver for your aging parent, or a disabled dependent, you may be putting your own needs aside to focus on others. While it’s important to temper optimism with practical or frugal thinking, we know that being in a constant state of worry or difficulty can result in depression and anxiety. Being selfish about your own health is one way to make 2018 better for yourself and the people you love. Tips for approaching situations with a positive attitude There are so many things we can do for ourselves to help our mental well-being. Here are some of the ways our team has resolved to put some positivity into our lives. It’s time to shake off feeling guilty for not having time for everything. Be aware of stressors like not having enough time to accomplish your to-do list, or trying to cram too much into one day. Get an agenda or app for your phone to help you visualize your time management. Eat less processed or fast food. It’s so tempting to indulge in tasty treats, especially when it means you don’t have to plan or prep your meals. Eating good food can really affect how your brain processes emotions and your overall well-being. Colourful, fresh food is as tasty as it is pleasant to look at! We love keeping...

ICYMI: Prevention and Dementia

We are constantly inundated with media telling us what to eat, how to exercise and which vitamins to take in order to prevent a plethora of diseases. Prevention (including regular exercise, avoiding smoking, eating healthy foods and controlling your blood pressure) is certainly a key factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Read more about our thoughts on prevention here. However, there are some diseases that remain a mystery, and we must try to manage as best as we can. One of these diseases is dementia. If you or your loved one has been diagnosed as having dementia, we know that it can be scary to face an uncertain future. Learn more about dementia from the Alzheimer Society Canada New challenges will force you to adapt to your new reality. Speaking may become difficult, and you may not be able to participate in life as you have become accustomed to doing. Resources for dealing with Dementia We know that scientists have been researching the cause of dementia, and hopefully a cure. There is no conclusive treatment for the disease, but we can educate ourselves. We can learn how to take care of our bodies and adapt to changing needs. In the meantime, we’ve compiled some resources for you and your family to use. They may be helpful to you, and of course we always offer them as suggestions (not as substitutes for your healthcare professional’s opinion.)   Cognitive exercises Train your brain: exercises to help your cognitive abilities There are so many puzzles and games you can use to help keep your brain sharp. Retire-At-Home also offers Fit Minds Cognitive Stimulation Programming, which includes...

Happy New Year!

Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton is excited about 2018! We hope you had a wonderful holiday with your loved ones. Thank you for following our blog and our activities on social media in 2017. Some of our favourite highlights of 2017: Attending community events and meeting new people Starting up our Book Club (have you joined yet? Find us on Facebook) Celebrating birthdays with our clients We hope that the new year bring a you all health and happiness. The sky is the limit! P.S. please be safe and stay warm amid this week’s cold weather warning!...
Is Dementia Preventable?

Is Dementia Preventable?

We are constantly inundated with media telling us what to eat, how to exercise and which vitamins to take in order to prevent a plethora of diseases. Prevention (including regular exercise, avoiding smoking, eating healthy foods and controlling your blood pressure) is certainly a key factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Read more about our thoughts on prevention here. However, there are some diseases that remain a mystery, and we must try to manage as best as we can. One of these diseases is dementia. If you or your loved one has been diagnosed as having dementia, we know that it can be scary to face an uncertain future. Learn more about dementia from the Alzheimer Society Canada   New challenges will force you to adapt to your new reality. Speaking may become difficult, and you may not be able to participate in life as you have become accustomed to doing. Resources for dealing with Dementia We know that scientists have been researching the cause of dementia, and hopefully a cure. There is no conclusive treatment for the disease, but we can educate ourselves. We can learn how to take care of our bodies and adapt to changing needs. In the meantime, we’ve compiled some resources for you and your family to use. They may be helpful to you, and of course we always offer them as suggestions (not as substitutes for your healthcare professional’s opinion.)   Cognitive exercises Train your brain: exercises to help your cognitive abilities There are so many puzzles and games you can use to help keep your brain sharp. Retire-At-Home also offers Fit Minds...
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