1-888-509-9394 or 905-864-9020
2018 is the Year of Positive Thinking

2018 is the Year of Positive Thinking

We’re into the second week of 2018, and some of us are struggling to maintain our resolutions. It’s easy to say that we’ll eat better, or exercise more, or be kind to others. Putting all of this into practice can be, to put it lightly, tiring. If you are a caregiver for your aging parent, or a disabled dependent, you may be putting your own needs aside to focus on others. While it’s important to temper optimism with practical or frugal thinking, we know that being in a constant state of worry or difficulty can result in depression and anxiety. Being selfish about your own health is one way to make 2018 better for yourself and the people you love. Tips for approaching situations with a positive attitude There are so many things we can do for ourselves to help our mental well-being. Here are some of the ways our team has resolved to put some positivity into our lives. It’s time to shake off feeling guilty for not having time for everything. Be aware of stressors like not having enough time to accomplish your to-do list, or trying to cram too much into one day. Get an agenda or app for your phone to help you visualize your time management. Eat less processed or fast food. It’s so tempting to indulge in tasty treats, especially when it means you don’t have to plan or prep your meals. Eating good food can really affect how your brain processes emotions and your overall well-being. Colourful, fresh food is as tasty as it is pleasant to look at! We love keeping...
Hospital Etiquette and Your Dignity

Hospital Etiquette and Your Dignity

Maintaining your dignity while recovering from an illness or surgery can be difficult. We may feel like we’re just another number in a system that’s overburdened by limited space, overworked staff and strict guidelines on service allocation. We may have personal issues regarding how hospitals force us to live while we are there. The current climate in health care in Ontario is that patients must also embody the adjective implied by their title. Many Ontario residents are having difficulty finding a family doctor, so the ER is often busy. Emergency room wait times can vary, and patients are expected to spend 4-10 hours waiting for medical attention. Patients are often discharged when they are well enough to continue their recovery where they don’t occupy a bed needed by a more urgent circumstance. The transition from the hospital to another location, usually home or a long-term care facility, can be stressful. It’s important to know what your options are well before your discharge date, so do some independent research in addition to speaking with your doctor and nurses. Find a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) service area near you Learn about your rights   Maintaining your dignity We try to remember that the people who trained to help people when they are at their most vulnerable are doing the work because they actually do care about your well-being and dignity. We are an important part of the equation when it comes to maintaining our own dignity, because our hospital etiquette can have an impact on the way we interact with others. Nurses are paid to take care of us, but...
How Do You Find a Nurse or Caregiver Who is Right for You?

How Do You Find a Nurse or Caregiver Who is Right for You?

When sourcing private companies to provide healthcare services, finding the right nurse or caregiver for you or your family can be a daunting task. If you have specific needs or difficulty communicating, it can feel like you’re searching for the impossible. Try not to be stressed about it! Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton can help you. Get started Take a breath, and make a list of your needs. It’s helpful to determine your budget as well. The following checklist can help you get started: gather medication and medical history make notes on physical limitations list all the equipment you use indicate all the languages you understand ask people in your community about potential referrals. You may have a personal support worker or nurse living in your neighbourhood! talk to your doctor about reputable organizations or companies go online and research local options participate in interviews with potential candidates talk with your family or banker about finances make a list of services you need and the ones you’d like to have compare prices and value the way you would when budgeting for any large expense Why is this list important? The list above is not comprehensive, especially if your circumstances are unique. The main idea to take away is that you need to consider a nurse or caregiver’s ability to provide quality healthcare or companionship. Nurses and caregivers are accustomed to meeting people from all walks of life. This experience, along with loads of patience, means that it takes a special person to care for someone who may need a lot of attention. Our caregivers and nurses build relationships with...
FAQs: Palliative Care and Respite Care

FAQs: Palliative Care and Respite Care

Our team receives many inquiries about our respite care and palliative care services.  We thought it would be helpful to share this information with our readers as well. It’s important to note that these two services are not mutually exclusive. This means that a patient doesn’t have to be terminally ill in order for a caregiver to need respite care. What are respite care and palliative care How Respite Care Can Bring Balance to Your Life  What is Palliative Care, and How Does it Affect You?    Did you know? You can ask for respite care when you’re the caregiver for someone who is temporarily ill or disabled as the result of an accident. You can also ask for respite care when your loved one is terminally ill, and as their caregiver, you need someone to take over while you sleep or do other important tasks.   FAQs How do you select a caregiver for a patient? When you contact us for a complimentary nurse consultation, we spend some time getting to know you and your family. We focus on what you think is important in a home care plan, your specific needs and preferences, and what you expect from the caregiver’s visits. Does my private insurance or OHIP cover some or all of the cost of the services you offer? If you want to stay in an assisted living facility, you can call us for suggestions on local retirement residences. Prices vary. Your policy will outline the benefits you can claim, but the most commonly covered benefits are those of a Personal Support Worker and nursing services. There...
Accidents Can Happen at Any Age

Accidents Can Happen at Any Age

Have you been in a motor vehicle accident? Have you suffered a sports injury? You don’t have to be a senior to benefit from our services at Retire-At-Home Halton. If you’re reading this blog and are thinking: yes! Maybe someone gets it…please keep reading! Anyone can experience an event that will make the things that used to be effortless seem impossible. That feeling of helplessness can be frustrating, humbling and, at times, so overwhelming that you want to give up. We understand that having to think about rehabilitation and paying for additional medical expenses can be extremely stressful. Our goal is to provide you with the services you need at a reasonable cost.   Health Insurance and the cost of getting better Getting the health care you need can often involve several insurance plans, especially if your home province has limitations on the services its infrastructure can provide. Prescription medication is usually dispensed at your own cost, no matter where you live. Each province and territory has its own publicly-funded health care plan that offers certain services at no additional cost to you, if you qualify for them. Most private health care insurance options require you to have valid provincial plan coverage as well because they complement one another. You can choose from various levels of coverage. If you have a car, auto insurance is mandatory. Depending on your coverage level, services like attendant care is an option for contributors who have suffered an injury from an accident. Ontario auto insurance resources Find out more about motor vehicle accident benefit claims policies in Ontario by visiting the Financial Services...
What is Palliative Care, and How Does It Affect You?

What is Palliative Care, and How Does It Affect You?

Palliative care is a term used to describe the health care for a patient who has been diagnosed with a serious illness such as cancer. The World Health Organization offers the following definition: Palliative care is an approach that improves the quality of life of patients and their families facing the problem associated with life-threatening illness, through the prevention and relief of suffering by means of early identification and impeccable assessment and treatment of pain and other problems, physical, psycho-social and spiritual. When you are facing a life-threatening illness, addressing both the tangled knot of feelings that you just can’t seem to sort out and palliative care services can be overwhelming. Each person going through the stages of grief (denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance) has a unique perspective. The goal is to make the patient as comfortable as possible whilst they are undergoing treatments that can cause mild to severe side-effects, manage pain, and maintain a good quality of life throughout these stages.   The reality of dealing with a serious illness and death Finding out that you have an illness that can end your life is one of those moments that changes you, and it can also alter the way you perceive everything and everyone. Positive thinking is a key factor in making the most of each day, and you hold that power. In some cases, patients have very little time to truly understand and accept what’s happening to them. In other situations, the patient must deal with difficulty over a long period of time. No matter what your situation is, it’s important to take advantage of...
Click here forFree CareConsultation