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ICYMI: Prevention and Dementia

We are constantly inundated with media telling us what to eat, how to exercise and which vitamins to take in order to prevent a plethora of diseases. Prevention (including regular exercise, avoiding smoking, eating healthy foods and controlling your blood pressure) is certainly a key factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Read more about our thoughts on prevention here. However, there are some diseases that remain a mystery, and we must try to manage as best as we can. One of these diseases is dementia. If you or your loved one has been diagnosed as having dementia, we know that it can be scary to face an uncertain future. Learn more about dementia from the Alzheimer Society Canada New challenges will force you to adapt to your new reality. Speaking may become difficult, and you may not be able to participate in life as you have become accustomed to doing. Resources for dealing with Dementia We know that scientists have been researching the cause of dementia, and hopefully a cure. There is no conclusive treatment for the disease, but we can educate ourselves. We can learn how to take care of our bodies and adapt to changing needs. In the meantime, we’ve compiled some resources for you and your family to use. They may be helpful to you, and of course we always offer them as suggestions (not as substitutes for your healthcare professional’s opinion.)   Cognitive exercises Train your brain: exercises to help your cognitive abilities There are so many puzzles and games you can use to help keep your brain sharp. Retire-At-Home also offers Fit Minds Cognitive Stimulation Programming, which includes...

ICYMI: Leading a Healthy Lifestyle and Aging Well

Prioritizing your health is often one of the things we don’t do because we’re so busy with everything else going on. That is, until our bodies begin to whisper little reminders like: “Did you get your flu shot?” or “Maybe you shouldn’t eat that?” because we do know that maintaining a healthy lifestyle and prevention is often the best way to reduce the occurrence of major health issues, whether chronic or acute. Chronic vs Acute conditions A chronic health condition develops over time. Osteoporosis, asthma, ALS, diabetes, and arthritis are a few examples of chronic conditions that can worsen as we age if we don’t take steps to help our bodies. Learn more here. Acute conditions are often severe and develop suddenly, like broken bones or skin burns, or the flu. They eventually go away, but it’s important to see your health professional to determine whether there is an underlying cause for these occurrences, such as genetic predisposition or lifestyle choices such as diet and physical exercise. How are you aging? Aging is something we, unfortunately, cannot prevent. Getting older has always been something that I’ve looked forward to. As each year passes, I feel more at ease with myself, and as a result I enjoy life more. I do notice, however, that I need to spend more time choosing foods that have certain nutritional value for any one of my ailments (whether you have diabetes, liver disease or high blood pressure, there are tasty foods for you!) I also go to the doctor more often to monitor potentially serious issues, and I’ve found that recovering from illness or injury takes a little bit...

ICYMI: Tips on How to Manage Your Stay in a Hospital

Maintaining your dignity while recovering from an illness or surgery can be difficult. We may feel like we’re just another number in a system that’s overburdened by limited space, overworked staff and strict guidelines on service allocation. We may have personal issues regarding how hospitals force us to live while we are there. The current climate in health care in Ontario is that patients must also embody the adjective implied by their title. Many Ontario residents are having difficulty finding a family doctor, so the ER is often busy. Emergency room wait times can vary, and patients are expected to spend 4-10 hours waiting for medical attention. Patients are often discharged when they are well enough to continue their recovery where they don’t occupy a bed needed by a more urgent circumstance. The transition from the hospital to another location, usually home or a long-term care facility, can be stressful. It’s important to know what your options are well before your discharge date, so do some independent research in addition to speaking with your doctor and nurses. Find a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) service area near you Learn about your rights   Maintaining your dignity We try to remember that the people who trained to help people when they are at their most vulnerable are doing the work because they actually do care about your well-being and dignity. We are an important part of the equation when it comes to maintaining our own dignity, because our hospital etiquette can have an impact on the way we interact with others. Nurses are paid to take care of us, but they are...
Hospital Etiquette and Your Dignity

Hospital Etiquette and Your Dignity

Maintaining your dignity while recovering from an illness or surgery can be difficult. We may feel like we’re just another number in a system that’s overburdened by limited space, overworked staff and strict guidelines on service allocation. We may have personal issues regarding how hospitals force us to live while we are there. The current climate in health care in Ontario is that patients must also embody the adjective implied by their title. Many Ontario residents are having difficulty finding a family doctor, so the ER is often busy. Emergency room wait times can vary, and patients are expected to spend 4-10 hours waiting for medical attention. Patients are often discharged when they are well enough to continue their recovery where they don’t occupy a bed needed by a more urgent circumstance. The transition from the hospital to another location, usually home or a long-term care facility, can be stressful. It’s important to know what your options are well before your discharge date, so do some independent research in addition to speaking with your doctor and nurses. Find a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) service area near you Learn about your rights   Maintaining your dignity We try to remember that the people who trained to help people when they are at their most vulnerable are doing the work because they actually do care about your well-being and dignity. We are an important part of the equation when it comes to maintaining our own dignity, because our hospital etiquette can have an impact on the way we interact with others. Nurses are paid to take care of us, but...

ICYMI: Managing the Cost of Health Care at Any Age

We don’t like to spend a lot of time talking about subjects that make others uncomfortable in social situations, especially money, but it’s important to start the conversation! All of us need to pay attention to how we spend our money, regardless of age. Asking for help is difficult for a lot of us, especially if we’re used to being independent. If you’re confined to your home because of mobility issues or you have a chronic illness like ALS, going out for groceries isn’t a simple chore. If you’ve been in a motor vehicle accident or have had knee surgery, you may be unable to do a lot of things on your own while you recover. We may have to consider the cost of using public transit safely, or taxi services. We may also need help physically, moving from our homes to a vehicle. The cost of health care In general, Canadians have the benefit of social programs to help us through tough times and to provide medical care. However, if you need services that aren’t covered by your provincial health care insurance, or you’d like to add services that are specific to your circumstances, you may need to look at private health care options. For example, if you are at risk for falls because you had hip or knee surgery, you may consider subscribing to Connect Care Medical Alert. While some people hold the opinion that there is no such thing as a fixed income problem specifically for seniors, they do have a different set of worries, especially if one doesn’t have a strong family support system available to them....

Home Health Care Supported by the Province of Ontario

Ontario is boosting benefits for nursing and personal support in home care In a news bulletin published October 5, 2017 by the Ontario Ministry of Health, in which is states: Ontario is strengthening home and community care across the province for patients and their families, by increasing access to services by an estimated 2.6 million additional hours and developing new patient- and family-friendly supports. The bulletin goes on to explain in detail the types of services that will be affected, which includes: nursing care personal support services (including bathing, dressing, and exercising) physiotherapy respite care services This is important news for people who want to remain in their own home while they age or convalesce after a hospital stay. Whether you have a long-term illness or have been in an accident, you may qualify for these additional benefits. Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton can work with you and your family to ensure you’re getting the care you need. How do you choose trustworthy home health care? Your safety and trust are our priority. We’ve addressed the topic of how to choose the right caregiver on this blog recently. We’ve had many of you asking us about the news item in one of Toronto’s newspapers. We want to ensure that you feel good about the decision to hire our team to manage your health care. If you have any questions about the services we provide, please don’t hesitate to call us or use our online chat service. Our clients can rely on us to provide timely care and respect their homes as if they were our own. A Client Care...
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