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The 2018 Provincial Budget: How Does It Affect Seniors?

The 2018 Provincial Budget: How Does It Affect Seniors?

If you live in Ontario and are a senior, you may be interested in what the 2018 Budget (provincial) has to say about what the Province is promising for the next year. The 2018 Budget plan, outlined here, addresses issues such as mental health, affordable housing, child care and making health care better and more accessible to everyone. Most significantly, the government is promising a fair approach to implementing the plan. The main points that are specifically geared toward the Province’s aging population show that our policy makers recognize that the cost of living independently can create barriers for seniors who wish to stay in their home. Retire-At-Home understands this as well. Our team of qualified Nurses and Client Care managers will work with you to identify the services you really need to help you stick to a budget. 2018 Budget highlights Expanding long-term care to make it more accessible (the plan is to add 5000 new beds by 2022, and 30,000 over the next decade.) A benefit of $750 annually for seniors 75 years of age and older, to help maintain their homes (e.g. this could help pay for custodial services such as snow removal, lawn maintenance and air duct cleaning, but the eligible expenses have not been revealed yet.) OHIP benefits will cover prescriptions for seniors in August 2019. Support for dental care costs. Expanding and improving home and community care for people who need nursing services, as well as for caregivers. Personal Support Workers (PSWs) will receive additional training and incentives (such as retirement security) to join the PSW workforce. Support for people living with Dementia...
Tips on Hiring a Caregiver or Nurse in the Halton Region

Tips on Hiring a Caregiver or Nurse in the Halton Region

You may have seen the news about a live-in caregiver who was charged with theft in Burlington. It can be a real eye-opener when we see these crimes reported, especially when they occur in our own community. Stealing from someone who has entrusted a new person with their care is a serious violation. Theft, physical violence, deprivation of nutrition, verbal abuse and neglect are all forms of abuse. Your safety is our number one priority, and we do not tolerate elder abuse, or any other form of abuse. Screening caregivers A proper vetting process administered by a professional in the healthcare industry can give you peace of mind. Hiring someone from a publicly available advertisement may not yield the most appropriate candidate. Be aware of scams that give unverified people access to your home. Retire-At-Home uses a thorough screening process when we hire caregivers and nurses. We run criminal record checks, verify work permits for foreign workers and check all certifications and vaccine records. Our hiring process also takes into consideration your specific needs or ability to communicate. It can feel like you’re searching for the impossible. Try not to be stressed about it! Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton can help you. Get started Take a breath, and make a list of your needs. It’s helpful to determine your budget as well. The following checklist can help you get started: gather medication and medical history make notes on physical limitations list all the equipment you use (rented or owned) indicate all the languages you understand or prefer to use ask people in your community about potential referrals. You may have a...

ICYMI: Prevention and Dementia

We are constantly inundated with media telling us what to eat, how to exercise and which vitamins to take in order to prevent a plethora of diseases. Prevention (including regular exercise, avoiding smoking, eating healthy foods and controlling your blood pressure) is certainly a key factor in maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Read more about our thoughts on prevention here. However, there are some diseases that remain a mystery, and we must try to manage as best as we can. One of these diseases is dementia. If you or your loved one has been diagnosed as having dementia, we know that it can be scary to face an uncertain future. Learn more about dementia from the Alzheimer Society Canada New challenges will force you to adapt to your new reality. Speaking may become difficult, and you may not be able to participate in life as you have become accustomed to doing. Resources for dealing with Dementia We know that scientists have been researching the cause of dementia, and hopefully a cure. There is no conclusive treatment for the disease, but we can educate ourselves. We can learn how to take care of our bodies and adapt to changing needs. In the meantime, we’ve compiled some resources for you and your family to use. They may be helpful to you, and of course we always offer them as suggestions (not as substitutes for your healthcare professional’s opinion.)   Cognitive exercises Train your brain: exercises to help your cognitive abilities There are so many puzzles and games you can use to help keep your brain sharp. Retire-At-Home also offers Fit Minds Cognitive Stimulation Programming, which includes...

ICYMI: How to Ease into Life at Your New Retirement Home

Finding a way to adjust to a new lifestyle can be challenging at any age. Moving into a retirement home can be especially difficult at first because you may be used to doing everything yourself. There are, however, plenty of positive aspects: a safe living environment friendly and qualified caregivers that can provide assistance based on your individual needs social opportunities you may not have had while living on your own you won’t need to take care of the yard and other home maintenance activities meal preparation is often done at retirement homes, so you can rest assured that you’re receiving proper nutrition Ask questions You’ve spent a lot of time finding the retirement home that suits your preferences and budget. Most of your questions have likely already been answered at this point, but there are so many aspects of retirement living that can only be discovered (and enjoyed!) once you actually move in. Don’t be shy! You deserve to have an active role in your living arrangements. Learn about what your package includes and how you can take advantage of all the resources available to you. Get social! Most people say that settling in and making their new space their own is the first thing they need to do when they move to a new place. We agree, and know that sometimes it can take a while for a retirement residence to feel like home. One of the best ways to ease into this major life change is to find other residents who share similar interests. Getting involved in community life can help. Attend welcome events for new...

ICYMI: Leading a Healthy Lifestyle and Aging Well

Prioritizing your health is often one of the things we don’t do because we’re so busy with everything else going on. That is, until our bodies begin to whisper little reminders like: “Did you get your flu shot?” or “Maybe you shouldn’t eat that?” because we do know that maintaining a healthy lifestyle and prevention is often the best way to reduce the occurrence of major health issues, whether chronic or acute. Chronic vs Acute conditions A chronic health condition develops over time. Osteoporosis, asthma, ALS, diabetes, and arthritis are a few examples of chronic conditions that can worsen as we age if we don’t take steps to help our bodies. Learn more here. Acute conditions are often severe and develop suddenly, like broken bones or skin burns, or the flu. They eventually go away, but it’s important to see your health professional to determine whether there is an underlying cause for these occurrences, such as genetic predisposition or lifestyle choices such as diet and physical exercise. How are you aging? Aging is something we, unfortunately, cannot prevent. Getting older has always been something that I’ve looked forward to. As each year passes, I feel more at ease with myself, and as a result I enjoy life more. I do notice, however, that I need to spend more time choosing foods that have certain nutritional value for any one of my ailments (whether you have diabetes, liver disease or high blood pressure, there are tasty foods for you!) I also go to the doctor more often to monitor potentially serious issues, and I’ve found that recovering from illness or injury takes a little bit...
The Question of Robot or Human Caregivers, and other Technology Woes

The Question of Robot or Human Caregivers, and other Technology Woes

Computers and other electronics are great, especially the ones that help us complete tasks efficiently. Online shopping is the way of the future. You can order your groceries, manage your finances, download e-books from the library, and shop for pretty much anything on the internet. Where do we draw the line? Think about the following: the quality of social interaction completing specific home health care tasks many people choose to live on a cash basis and don’t use credit cards we assume that every household has a computer and access to the internet. This is simply not the case. While we love how accessible the global market is via the internet, we’re still surprised that big companies like Walmart won’t take customer orders in-store. You can learn! If you didn’t grow up using a computer, or the concept of having a smart phone is daunting, we understand. Using a mousepad or external mouse can be a challenge for anyone who has arthritis or joint problems. However, many companies are making technology accessible to everyone by using intuitive software and touchscreens to allow users to point at what they want to do. With some effort, you can learn how to use a tablet or smart phone for hobbies or practical tasks. What do Robots have to do with health care? Have you seen the iRobot Roomba vacuum cleaner? It’s a self-contained cleaning unit that learns the spatial dimensions of your home to suck up all the debris. A robot is a programmable machine that performs an automated, repetitive function without the need for human interaction. Most of the robots in...
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