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Senior Safety in Public Spaces

Senior Safety in Public Spaces

The team at Retire-At-Home sends their sincere condolences to the families and friends of the victims of this week’s tragic attack on innocent bystanders at Yonge St. in Toronto. We want to take this time to remember our fellow citizens, who were just living their best lives in a public space. May they rest in peace. Your safety is our priority. We realize that we can’t control everything, but there are little things we can do to help us be safe when we’re out for shopping or lunch away from home. Get in a safety mindset When we decide to go out, we check for our wallet, purse and keys. Maybe we also pack our medication, tissues, and a bottle of water. Why not add some steps to help ensure that you have an excellent day and prevent injuries? Independent living can be challenging, including seniors or people who have some limitations, but it’s not impossible! Preparation is a key factor in making each day fulfilling. These tips are useful for anyone, and we invite you to share them to encourage safe habits. Tips for safe day trips Plan your route, whether you’re on your own or with a friend or caregiver. Knowing how to find the nearest amenities you may need along the way can prevent unnecessary detours or getting lost. Let someone know where you’re going and when to expect your return. If you are hurt or lost, someone will come to look for you or advise the police to help. Wear your Medical Alert medallion(s) and carry a list of your medication (if you don’t carry...

ICYMI: Tips on How to Manage Your Stay in a Hospital

Maintaining your dignity while recovering from an illness or surgery can be difficult. We may feel like we’re just another number in a system that’s overburdened by limited space, overworked staff and strict guidelines on service allocation. We may have personal issues regarding how hospitals force us to live while we are there. The current climate in health care in Ontario is that patients must also embody the adjective implied by their title. Many Ontario residents are having difficulty finding a family doctor, so the ER is often busy. Emergency room wait times can vary, and patients are expected to spend 4-10 hours waiting for medical attention. Patients are often discharged when they are well enough to continue their recovery where they don’t occupy a bed needed by a more urgent circumstance. The transition from the hospital to another location, usually home or a long-term care facility, can be stressful. It’s important to know what your options are well before your discharge date, so do some independent research in addition to speaking with your doctor and nurses. Find a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) service area near you Learn about your rights   Maintaining your dignity We try to remember that the people who trained to help people when they are at their most vulnerable are doing the work because they actually do care about your well-being and dignity. We are an important part of the equation when it comes to maintaining our own dignity, because our hospital etiquette can have an impact on the way we interact with others. Nurses are paid to take care of us, but they are...
Hospital Etiquette and Your Dignity

Hospital Etiquette and Your Dignity

Maintaining your dignity while recovering from an illness or surgery can be difficult. We may feel like we’re just another number in a system that’s overburdened by limited space, overworked staff and strict guidelines on service allocation. We may have personal issues regarding how hospitals force us to live while we are there. The current climate in health care in Ontario is that patients must also embody the adjective implied by their title. Many Ontario residents are having difficulty finding a family doctor, so the ER is often busy. Emergency room wait times can vary, and patients are expected to spend 4-10 hours waiting for medical attention. Patients are often discharged when they are well enough to continue their recovery where they don’t occupy a bed needed by a more urgent circumstance. The transition from the hospital to another location, usually home or a long-term care facility, can be stressful. It’s important to know what your options are well before your discharge date, so do some independent research in addition to speaking with your doctor and nurses. Find a Local Health Integration Network (LHIN) service area near you Learn about your rights   Maintaining your dignity We try to remember that the people who trained to help people when they are at their most vulnerable are doing the work because they actually do care about your well-being and dignity. We are an important part of the equation when it comes to maintaining our own dignity, because our hospital etiquette can have an impact on the way we interact with others. Nurses are paid to take care of us, but...

ICYMI: Managing the Cost of Health Care at Any Age

We don’t like to spend a lot of time talking about subjects that make others uncomfortable in social situations, especially money, but it’s important to start the conversation! All of us need to pay attention to how we spend our money, regardless of age. Asking for help is difficult for a lot of us, especially if we’re used to being independent. If you’re confined to your home because of mobility issues or you have a chronic illness like ALS, going out for groceries isn’t a simple chore. If you’ve been in a motor vehicle accident or have had knee surgery, you may be unable to do a lot of things on your own while you recover. We may have to consider the cost of using public transit safely, or taxi services. We may also need help physically, moving from our homes to a vehicle. The cost of health care In general, Canadians have the benefit of social programs to help us through tough times and to provide medical care. However, if you need services that aren’t covered by your provincial health care insurance, or you’d like to add services that are specific to your circumstances, you may need to look at private health care options. For example, if you are at risk for falls because you had hip or knee surgery, you may consider subscribing to Connect Care Medical Alert. While some people hold the opinion that there is no such thing as a fixed income problem specifically for seniors, they do have a different set of worries, especially if one doesn’t have a strong family support system available to them....

Home Health Care Supported by the Province of Ontario

Ontario is boosting benefits for nursing and personal support in home care In a news bulletin published October 5, 2017 by the Ontario Ministry of Health, in which is states: Ontario is strengthening home and community care across the province for patients and their families, by increasing access to services by an estimated 2.6 million additional hours and developing new patient- and family-friendly supports. The bulletin goes on to explain in detail the types of services that will be affected, which includes: nursing care personal support services (including bathing, dressing, and exercising) physiotherapy respite care services This is important news for people who want to remain in their own home while they age or convalesce after a hospital stay. Whether you have a long-term illness or have been in an accident, you may qualify for these additional benefits. Our team at Retire-At-Home Halton can work with you and your family to ensure you’re getting the care you need. How do you choose trustworthy home health care? Your safety and trust are our priority. We’ve addressed the topic of how to choose the right caregiver on this blog recently. We’ve had many of you asking us about the news item in one of Toronto’s newspapers. We want to ensure that you feel good about the decision to hire our team to manage your health care. If you have any questions about the services we provide, please don’t hesitate to call us or use our online chat service. Our clients can rely on us to provide timely care and respect their homes as if they were our own. A Client Care...
Medical Crowdfunding vs. Health Insurance

Medical Crowdfunding vs. Health Insurance

Money is an uncomfortable topic of conversation for many of us, especially in social settings like dinner with friends or whilst meeting with our bank manager. Let’s talk about the cost of medical care. OHIP (Ontario Health Insurance Plan) and other social programs on the provincial and federal levels often meet most of our needs. However, if you’re unable to work due to an accident or illness, the bills start piling up. If you need certain medications, the cost can be overwhelming for some budgets, even for people who are good at saving.   The limits of OHIP In Ontario, we’re lucky to have publicly-funded health care, because it means that we have reasonably good access to quality medical care.  We have excellent, state-of-the-art hospitals like the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital and the Trillium Health Partners facilities. There are, however, limitations. You may have to wait a long time for expensive diagnostics like an MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) because the equipment isn’t readily available. Some services are not covered, or cover part of what you need, such as attendant care, experimental drug therapies, physiotherapy, or respite care services. Prescription medication isn’t covered. Invest in your health OHIP is the default health insurance in Ontario. It’s a good idea to have supplemental coverage. This allows you to have more financial benefits for the things that are only partially included in our provincial plan. Remember that each plan is likely to have clauses that don’t allow for duplicate payment (through another plan) for the same claim item. Ask your employer about options to customize your health insurance benefits Ensure you get a...
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